THE EXTRAORDINARY FATHER IS A PRAYER WARRIOR

“Men ought always to pray and not to faint” (Luke 18:1).

There he was once again in that familiar place, position, and time. Early mornings found my dad on his knees beside his desk in prayer. He was evidently in passionate, pleading, pouring-out-his-heart intercession. This was no ritual. This was warfare; this was a calling; this was the most important task of the day. This was the place to fight for righteousness and to declare war on ungodliness!

Dad, your family needs for you to be their prayer warrior! What does a prayer warrior dad look like?

  1. A Prayer Warrior Dad leads the charge in prayer at home. He initiates prayer. The word “ought” calls forth this action as being necessary; it is a duty of man, therefore a duty of dads. Leading this charge in prayer is a 24/7 operation. This calling is not left up to moms. When mealtime rolls around, dad prays or calls on someone else to do so. When a member of the family is carrying a burden, needs wisdom, or is rejoicing in God’s provision, dad stops whatever he is doing and prays with them, whether at home or via the phone.
  2. A Prayer Warrior Dad fights his daily battles on his knees. We can pray standing, sitting, lying down, with our eyes open or closed, or with our arms stretched out. One of the most common ways to pray is kneeling. For a warrior to successfully engage in the battle, he realizes he needs the support of his fellow soldiers, his weapon, tactical plans, and commanding officer. When a prayer warrior dad goes to his knees “to pray,” he is acknowledging that his greatest support for battle comes from the throne of grace.
  3. A Prayer Warrior Dad does not lose heart in prayer. A good soldier is trained to give his life for his country; to be able to endure extreme treatment of men; to brave the worst of battle conditions; to remain true in the face of the enemy. A good soldier may retreat but it is only to fight again another day. He never gives up! Dad, you must not “faint,” lose heart, and quit praying. Dr. Bob Jones, Sr., said, “You and God make a majority.” You are on the winning side. Pray on even in the worst of circumstances! Pray on when you feel like giving up. Pray on when you lack wisdom. Pray on even when you do not see answers to prayer. Pray on when the doctor says, “You’ve got cancer.” Pray on through all the roadblocks, potholes, curves, and uncertainties of child training. Pray on when your job overwhelms you. Dad, be a warrior and pray on! Don’t quit!

Are you seen by your family as the prayer warrior of your home? Do you have a special place where you meet with the Lord every day—a place where you can talk to your Heavenly Father in an audible voice, pray Scripture, sing, rejoice, praise, weep, and passionately cry out to Him with all your heart? As you surrender to God each day, declaring your dependence upon Him, you will not lose heart in prayer.

Seeing my dad on his knees many, many times, crying out to the Lord in prayer, tears coursing their way down his cheeks as he interceded for others, is a picture indelibly written on my heart and mind.

Dad, if you aren’t the prayer warrior for your home, who will be? Your family needs for you to be their prayer warrior!

To Think and Pray About…

  • Feel the great weight of the words of Jesus: “Men ought always to pray and not to faint.”
  • As a dad, how best do you think you might begin to set a consistent and natural example to your family as a prayer warrior?
  • What changes might you have to make in your lifestyle if you are to be a consistent leader in prayer in your home?

This chapter was written by Pastor Dale Cunningham.

Taken from The Extraordinary Father. CLICK HERE for more information.

 

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Harold Vaughan

View posts by Harold Vaughan
Evangelist Harold Vaughan is the founder of Christ Life Ministries, Inc. To date, his ministry has led him to preach in forty-eight states and many foreign countries. Click on "ABOUT" in the menu bar to learn more about Harold.
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